Bubak And Hungaricus – Anonymous

Bubak And Hungaricus is early 18th Century gypsy music which was arranged by Jaroslav Krček and included on the Amadeus soundtrack.  The composer is unknown, but it’s a fun old Central European folk musical piece which seems to have been turned into a court dance tune over time. These folk dances which was performed at the palace as a curtain raiser to Mozart’s music show how classical composers constantly drew from the folk music that was all around them.

In the feudal courts of Europe, the usual instruments of strings, cornets, and harpsichords were often joined by folk instruments, like a bagpipe made from a sheep’s bladder. The ensemble heard here includes an ancient recorder-like flute, and a curious single-string double bass with a penetrating drone, the tromba marina, so named because it was used as a foghorn on ships.

Reference:
1. Amadeus – The Music – A musical process

“The more I live, the more I learn. The more I learn, the more I realize, the less I know.”- Michel Legrand

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Music
10 comments on “Bubak And Hungaricus – Anonymous
  1. Bruce says:

    That’s the way a good basic tune should go! It had me tapping!

  2. badfinger20 says:

    That does have a folk sound…I enjoyed it.

  3. selizabryangmailcom says:

    I love how it kept getting faster and faster. I’m not a dancer and it made ME want to dance. Or go back in time and watch them dance.

    • Yes, I was reminiscing that above with Bruce. There isn’t a song off the Amadeus soundtrack which doesn’t move me in profound ways. Even this seemingly innocuous composition really does it for me.

      I’m not a dancer as well and that doesn’t go down too well here in Colombia where infants can swing their hips like Shakira and I mean that most technically. I’m chuffed you liked it Stacey.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow Blog via Email

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 457 other followers

%d bloggers like this: