In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of humankind landing on the moon

Landing MoonThat’s one small step for (a) man,
one giant leap for mankind.

-Neil Armstrong

Note that I didn’t write: “That’s one small step for man”.

After returning from space, Armstrong said there was a lost word in his famous one-liner from the moon: “That’s one small step for ‘a’ man.” It’s just that people just didn’t hear it.” You can read more about that here.

I doubt there is a more widely recognized quote (or misquote) in the history of humankind than Neil Armstrong’s words as he took his first step on the moon.

I realise this post is four days premature since Neil Armstrong didn’t land on the moon until July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC. But today marks the lifting off of Apollo 11 from Cape Kennedy.

To mark the event, tomorrow night I will go see the highly anticipated documentary Apollo 11 at my local cinema. Also you can relive the journey on you tube in one single LIVE broadcast over six days.

I highly recommend the following mini-documentary about how NASA recovered and studies the moon rocks – Where does NASA keep the Moon Rocks?:

“The more I live, the more I learn. The more I learn, the more I realize, the less I know.”- Michel Legrand

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Posted in News, Science
19 comments on “In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of humankind landing on the moon
  1. badfinger20 says:

    I just commented on Hans site… What an incredible feat this was… a pocket calculator has more computing power than those 1969 NASA computers did. It shows you what mankind can do if pulling together.

    • Amazing indeed! Han’s post inspired me to write this brief post in commemoration of the moonlanding. I might need to revisit the ‘First Man’ movie which I saw in the cine a year or so ago which was directed by La La Land’s Damien Chazelle.

  2. hanspostcard says:

    I can’t think of a more famous quote than Armstrong’s. I think you will enjoy the Apollo 11 doc- I didn’t get to see it on the big screen- saw it on tv- i would imagine in a theater it would even be better. .. interesting tidbit on one of the recent docs I watched- Armstrong was offered a million dollars to sign 100 photographs- and refused. He was the right choice- but a reluctant hero.

    • I was just saying to ‘Bad’ that I will revisit Damien Chazelle’s ‘First Man’ movie over the coming days. I will also watch that PBS doco you mentioned if it’s available. I’m especially looking forward to watching Apollo 11 on the big screen tomorrow given your feedback.
      I never knew that about Armstrong, but it doesn’t surprise me given what I have seen about him. Like you, I’m glad he was chosen to represent humankind given his unassuming and modest demeanor.

      • hanspostcard says:

        Last week our library had a showing of First Man -it was the second time I had seen it. I liked it and so did the other 30 or so who were in attendance. Yes Chasing The Moon a great overview of NASA up to an including the Moon landing and not just focusing on astronauts.

      • I just downloaded First Man. It will be my second viewing too. I liked it as well and I’m wondering how it will hold up after a second viewing. I’m currently watching ‘Chasing the Moon’ as I prepare Lunch . It’s good so far, although it’s covering the Cold war political history which I am already very familiar with. I’ll report back later on how I found it. Thanks for the recommendation Hans.

      • hanspostcard says:

        Hope you like Chasing The Moon- of the ones I have seen recently that seems to be the best.

      • I was only able to find the first episode in you tube which mainly featured the cold war race to space and Kennedy’s initiative. It was excellent. The footage was spectacular. Extremely well done. I learnt a lot of new things including the Nazi scientists involvement and Kennedy’s desire for a joint program with the Russians. I’ll try and find the remaining episodes.

      • hanspostcard says:

        The series did a good job on the behind the scenes characters- not just an astronaut story.

      • Exactly. It’s extremely comprehensive and engaging. The comments by one of the Astronaut’s wives about their ‘fooling around’ was interesting.

  3. I remember it clear as a bell watching the moon landing on black and white (and snowy) TV! It’s a shame that they haven’t as yet changed the wording of that famous poem: Hey diddle diddle the cat and the fiddle The bovine jumped over the moon. Fair is fair…

    • Yes, they should have been more politically correct/astute or ‘gender inclusive’ (is that the phrase). Haha.
      It’s strange watching documentaries of people watching ‘snowy’ television way back then and still getting excited. Sometimes you wonder if the resolution may have been better if they just dusted off their telescopes at night-time and pointed it at the cheese in the sky!

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Matthew Kick

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